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Cleaning the bugs from a windscreen

I recently had a gorgeous and historic Aston Martin DB3 S to shoot at Goodwood for a magazine feature and, tight on time, and with rain threatening, had to shoot the statics quickly straight after the track test.

Aston Martin DB3S-3
Aston Martin DB3S-3

This isn’t ideal as the car can collect a myriad of bugs on the windscreen and I only noticed when I got back home and was back in front of my Mac editing the images. Glass or lightweight perspex in this case is always tricky to retouch as the light is often graduated from light to darker across the panel and great care must be taken with the clone tool or healing brush to avoid making a mess of it.

Aston Martin DB3S-1
Aston Martin DB3S-1

A quick solution is to start out with the clone tool set to a low opacity of 60-80% and copy over each bug mark from a point immediately adjacent to it on a high magnification and then go over it again at 15-25% with larger brush from the cloning tool palette to smooth any marks…

Aston Martin DB3S-2w
Aston Martin DB3S-2w

 

Shooting in different studios

Infinity cove studios are getting rarer and rarer these days and costs rising so it’s important to choose the right one to suit your shoot. Too big and you won’t be able to focus your lighting properly, too small and you won’t achieve the angles you want. The concept of the cove is to remove all distractions in the background allowing you to paint the car with your lighting. First rule if you working with constant movie style lighting is to point the lights away from the car into the walls and ceiling ,not towards the car.

Alfa Guilietta SS
Alfa Guilietta SS( photo Rupert Cobb)

There are a number of different types of cove:-The Alfa Romeo Gulietta SS is being photographed in a 3/4 cove called Gun Hill Studio in Sussex with a fixed floating ceiling that can only be raised and lowered not moved in and out of the cove.

The Citroen DS below was for a book shoot in a cove built within a private collection called Studio 434 north of London in Pottars Bar .With just 2 walls and a floating ceiling we needed to fill in the missing third wall with large poly boards which is not ideal…as it is difficult to get a good reflection. It would be OK if you are using large soft boxes with flash however but here we have constant tungsten lighting.

Citron DS studio
Citroen DS

One of my favourite coves is Plough studios in South London,below.It’s been a haunt of car and fashion snappers for nearly 50 years and the great Richard Avedon loved it so much he block booked it every year during his working summers in the city.Ideal for one car it’s a small cove but good and deep with one long wall so although they have now removed the floating ceiling it still works well.Here’s the MGB Roadster I photographed for the British Auto Legends stamps for the Royal Mail.http://www.royalmailgroup.com/royal-mail-celebrates-best-british-motor-cars-%E2%80%98british-auto-legends%E2%80%99-stamp-issue

MGB Roadster
MGB Roadster

A large full cove like Junction Eleven in Banbury, below, will have have three even walls and a solid ceiling .There is a floating ceiling that can be moved in and out and angled as in the image below of the super cool Jaguar XKSS. It is also painted mid grey in colour which reduces contrast and allows more subtle lighting rather than the white of the other featured coves.

Jaguar XKSS
Jaguar XKSS

Best 5 places to shoot at Goodwood Festival of Speed

I’m still recovering from this year’s fantastic Goodwood Festival of Speed.The event has grown from a small gathering of motoring enthusiasts with their cars going up Lord March’s Sussex country home’s drive into the largest motoring event in the UK .

917 pan
917 pan

With a slow pan of 1/60th second the grandstands blur nicely making the awesome 1973 Porsche 917 stand out in this image.A faster shutter speed would make the busy background sharper and the car trickier to pick out. 70-300mm f5.6 1/60th second

Aston Martin Vulcan
Aston Martin Vulcan

I caught this grabbed image of the brand new Aston Martin Hybrid as it headed back from it’s run up the hill…I like the excited people in the shot and the dust kicking up behind the car. 70-300mm f5.6 1/250th second

Chevy smokin'
Chevy smokin’

The super cars very often light up their tyres on their way up the hill like this 2016 Camaro burning rubber. Don’t centre the car in the frame but leave more space in front to give the idea of it moving forward.70-300mm f5.6 1/500th second

McLaren M8F
McLaren M8F

This is one of my favourite views looking down the drive to the start line, here with the awesome 730bhp 1972 McLaren M8F driven by Andrew Newell.It’s a difficult shot as the car drives through the shadow and highlight from the trees above.Pre-shoot a few frames to work out the best balance of contrast.70-300mm f5.6 1/640th second

Renault Streamliner
Renault Streamliner

Another good place to catch all the action is the start line.Here the Renault Streamliner takes off at quite a sedate pace. 17-40mm f9 1/250th second

1906 Renault GP
1906 Renault GP

If you only have one place to shoot over the weekend this image of the car driving past Goodwood house is probably the shot to go for.Here the 1906 Grand Prix Renault is nicely framed in a medium speed panning shot.To make sure you don’t lose the focal point during your pan switch off auto focus and pre-focus on the point where the car will be when you want to shoot it. 70-300mm f8 1/25th second

The full Monte-Carlo story : Top 5 atmosphere location

Shooting at the Monaco Historic Grand Prix is not only about the action imagery of course.You have to include the atmosphere and the incredible landscape to get the full story.

A1-Pit Lane
A1-Pit Lane

The pit lane is superb place to shoot the cars waiting to head out onto the track with the old town up on the hill in the background.17-40mm f11 1/125th second

Casino Sq
Casino Sq

No Monte Carlo visit is complete without shooting in Casino Square.50mm f11 1/250th second.

Massenet
Massenet

Peeping through the armco crops this Alfa Romeo nicely with the high end stores in the background to give context.17-40mm f8 1/500th second

Rascasse
Rascasse

The Rascasse turn is the second last before the finishing straight with cars often tustling for position around the restaurant stuck in the centre of the corner, nicely framed by the Alps Maritime in the background.17-40mm f11 1/250th second

Fairmont hairpin
Fairmont hairpin

If you are lucky enough to know someone or get a pass onto the roof of the Fairmont hotel this is the view you can capture.17-40mm f11 1/125th second

Top 6 places to shoot action on the Monte Carlo F1 circuit

I’ve just come back from a great weekend taking pictures at the Monaco Historics Grand Prix.This is held every two years  a couple of weeks before the modern GP and is one of the highlights of the classic racing season.

I’ve covered the event every year since it’s inception and each time I go I learn more about the circuit and find new places to shoot.So I thought I’d offer my best half a dozen places to photograph action at one of the most exciting race tracks in the world.

It is a confusing place to work however with access to the best track-side locations via a series of tunnels, secret stair-ways and lifts within the cliffs of the ancient principality .

Map of Monaco circuit
Map of Monaco circuit

I’ve numbered the turns on this lovely old map of the circuit so you can see where each image is taken.Most of these places are only accessible if you have a track-side tabard after signing on with the Automobile Club de Monaco.

Turn 1-C Type
Turn 1-C Type

This is one of the best paces to shoot the start St Devote, turn 1 accessed via a tunnel under the track and a guarded stairway.70-300mm f5.6 1/640th second

March at Turn 7
March at Turn 7

Crossing back under the track this great head on shot at Turn 7 is looking down the straight due south towards the sea, the harbour is immediately on the right. 300mm f4.5 1/800th second

Allard at turn 9
Allard at turn 9

Walking back down the pit lane and down the stairs to the second set of swimming pool curves this shot needs you to keep your nerve as the cars thunder past a few feet away.A high shutter speed is needed and a short pan. 70mm f5.6 1/000th second.

Maserati 250F at turn 10
Maserati 250F at turn 10

Turn 9 is in the background of this shot with photographers visible but there’s another good shot in this complex by turning around and photographing at the second corner turn 10. 70-300mm f5.6 1/500th second.

Formula Juniors at turn 8
Formula Juniors at turn 8

This is the first swimming pool complex.Again this is very fast with cars traveling at nearly 100mph coming towards you. 300mm f6.7 1/640th second.

Tec Mec at turn 4
Tec Mec at turn 4

There are lots of other locations to shoot a race from but if you have to go to one place then the Fairmont hairpin curves, formally known by all as Lowes , is a good place to head for.You can shoot about 4 action shots here with the cars usually bunched up and traveling a lot slower. 70-300mm f8 1/400th second

Shooting at McLaren F1 HQ

I’ve just come back from a great shoot at McLaren’s incredible futuristic Tech’ centre where they build the F1 cars and develop the road cars.Like many large organisations McLaren are very particular about who they let through their doors so it’s always exciting to visit and there are a special set of challenges to work there. Once through the security luck was on my side as I was able to park right outside the area where the 1968 M7C was located. They had moved it into a broad side passage off their boulevard where it is usually on display and I set up my ‘studio’ blocking off one end.

McLaren M7C-
McLaren M7C-

The magazine require a studio style portfolio of images for consistency and I have developed a way of shooting using black cloth to surround car and lighting with flash. It’s not ideal as flash is hard to control and requires quite a bit of post production work to smooth out the background but the result works well. The issue here were the high wings that meant I had to build a wall higher than the taller rear aerofoil. I balanced powerful mains Bowens monolights at the rear shining forward with soft boxes saving the less powerful battery powered Elinchrom Ranger lights for the foreground with daylight, this gives depth to the images with bright highlights drawing the eye into the picture. With only 3 hours allocated to my full shoot there was no time to waste and I finished just in time to clear the area and pack everything back into my estate car.

McLaren M7C-head on-
McLaren M7C-head on-

Dealing with nasty reflections on location

I had a reasonably typical experience the other day on an auction catalogue shoot with a stunning Aston Martin DB2/4 that was just out of MOT. We had planned to run the car to nice location to shoot it but short on time we had to compromise by photographing it in a fairly scruffy  garage back yard. All was not lost as the space had bamboo screening and it was a nice day and the shoot was going well until we had to turn the car for the nose left front 3/4 view.

Aston Martin DB2/4 with nasty reflection in the side
Aston Martin DB2/4 with nasty reflection in the side

This projected a horrible reflection of the brightly lit yard into the shaded side of the car but looking around we found a sheet of white painted ply which we used to shield the background with the added effect that it bounced the light back into the car lighting the side.

Aston Martin DB2/4 showing board
Aston Martin DB2/4 showing board

The result was pretty good…….

Aston Martin DB2/4
Aston Martin DB2/4

Tracking photography with the BMW i8

Had a great day recently at the Longcross test track in Surrey, just outside London, photographing a friends new BMW i8.It’s an awesome piece of kit with a hybrid power-train of electric motors driving the front wheels and 1.5litre turbocharged petrol engine the rear wheels delivering 0-60 in just over 4 seconds.

BMWi8 car to car
BMW i8 car to car 50mm f11 1/30th second

One of the advantages of photographing at a test track is that you don’t have to worry about other traffic making it great place to shoot car to car or tracking images where the camera car and feature car have to run along together.The idea of tracking is to show the car moving through its environment with the background and wheels blurring to give the sense of motion whilst keeping the car crisp in the foreground. Success is all about variables, a slower shutter speed will give more blur but it’s harder to hold the camera still on a moving platform. A faster shutter speed will freeze the car but offer less blur, so a balance is needed.

BMW i8 tracking
BMW i8 tracking 17-40mm f8 1/60th second

Hatchbacks make the best tracking cars and ideally a powerful estate where you can put the seats flat to allow you to lie down if needed. If you don’t have a harness wrap the rear seat belts around your waste and position yourself near to the open tailgate. It’s good idea to use walkie-talkies or mobile phones to communicate with the feature car but some simple hand signals will suffice. You’ll need good drivers in both cars who are capable of driving in close formation without panicking.Best speed to track a car for stills is about 40 mph.Faster and you may find the tailgate will close, although you can prop it open, slower and you won’t get the sense of speed necessary.

BMWi8 low angle tracking shot
BMWi8 low angle tracking shot

Start out with a wide angle lens or zoom and direct the car into the frame changing your angle to move the car within the viewfinder to include more or less moving roadway.Start with a faster shutter speed of about 1/125th second slowing down through 1/60th to 1/30th as you become more proficient and confident.

As with all action photography safety is paramount and your responsibility so don’t forget to hold on and don’t drop your camera.!

 

Creating a studio set up inside

I’ve recently been working on a series of shoots for book publisher Dorling Kindersley. They are known for their stunning studio style books with complicated spreads out of white but whilst they used to actually photograph their subjects in a studio, digital technology now allows for the same high quality images to be taken on location. This demands creating studio conditions on site, in this case the Haynes International Motor museum in Somerset and was complicated by mixed daylight, spot and fluorescent lighting which all need to be balanced up with flash.

Studio style lighting in a museum
Photographing in mixed lighting conditions needs to be controlled to get a consistent studio style result

We had to shroud a BMW CSI in white sheets to kill reflections into the windscreen and bodywork from skylights above the car.The back sheet is there to aid the cut out process with white seen through the car’s rear window.The foreground is lit by flash with a white reflector sheet lifting the exposure in the tyres, grille and front bumper but to get the necessary depth of field it helps to use the available light and a long exposure.

70-200mm lens F16 1/2 second

Documenting a restoration

One of the best ways to record the restoration of a classic car is to take photographs along the way. Not only will your pictures be a great part of the future history of the car but they may help you put it back together again afterwards.

Porsche 356 restoration
Porsche 356 restoration

If you get the chance shoot some photos of the car before it is dismantled and don’t be shy about including people involved in the work in your images as it brings them to life.

Porsche 356 restoration-2
Porsche 356 restoration-2- 1/8th second f8

Remember you are creating a record with your images so make sure you shoot all angles and try to catch as many of the processes as you can.Many workshops can be a bit dark so use a tripod , crank up the ASA and fill in the foreground with flash. Don’t get to close to any dangerous grinding or cutting and never look directly at any welding or you may damage your eyes.

Porsche 356 restoration-3
Porsche 356 restoration-3- 1/30th second f5.6

Ask the craftsman to pause if he can so you can catch the image. Mix up your angles and lenses to keep your pictures interesting and don’t be afraid to go in close….if it is safe.

Porsche 356 restoration-4
Porsche 356 restoration-4-1/15th second f8

Don’t worry too much about your white balance, it is more important to get a set of accurate images to document the restoration.